Category: Mojo Fun

Budgerigar (Farmland by Mojö Fun)

Budgerigars aka parakeets (Melopsittacus undulatus) are easily the most popular pet bird in the world. We enjoy their playful antics, cheerful chatter, ability to mimic humans, and the plethora of selectively bred color variations they come in. But like all domesticated animals they have their roots in the wild where they live far different lives …

Emperor Scorpion (Wildlife by Mojö Fun)

The emperor scorpion, Pandinus imperator, is a large species of scorpion endemic to the rainforests and savanna of Africa. Because of their large size, hardy nature, docile behavior, and relatively mild venom, they are popular in the pet trade (I had them growing up). This species is no stranger to the toy animal industry, and …

Gray Whale (Maia & Borges, Schleich, Mojö Fun, Unknown Company)

Review and images by callmejoe3; edited by bmathison1972 Today’s review will cover the Northern Pacific voyager, the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus). The gray whale is a very well-known mysticete due to frequent sightings during whale-watching tours along the American west coast. Gray whales were also known as the ‘’Devil-fish’’ due to the aggression they display …

Humpback Whale (Maia & Borges, Schleich, Mojö Fun)

Review and images by callmejoe3; edited by bmathison1972 This review will cover an exceptional mysticete, the humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae). The humpback is a well-recognized whale due to its breaching behavior and unique appearance. While placed in a separate genus from most other rorquals, modern genomic studies consistently report the humpback whale as the closest …

Killer Whale (Sealife by Mojö Fun)

Review and images by callmejoe3; edited by bmathison1972 This blog managed to cover a wide variety of cetaceans before getting to today’s species, the killer whale (Orcinus orca). The public perception of killer whales has a rather dramatic history compared to most cetaceans. In Europe, the killer whale’s status as an apex predator led to …

Pronghorn (Wildlife by Mojö Fun)

In nature, anachronisms are an interesting mystery. Why do Lemurs cry out in terror of birds that won’t attack them? Why do avocados’ have such large seeds? Why do the trees of New Zealand have sharp leaves as saplings? The animal of this review has an intriguing be partially useful anachronism, the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana), …

Quagga (Prehistoric & Extinct by Mojö Fun)

Review and images by Suspsy; edited by bmathison1972 The quagga (†Equus quagga quagga) was a South African subspecies of zebra, immediately recognizable by its unique stripe pattern. During the 19th century, it was hunted relentlessly for its skin and meat, and to eliminate it as competition for domestic animals. Last minute attempts to preserve the …