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Animals with fingernails/toenails

Started by animaltoyforum, November 22, 2016, 10:17:45 PM

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animaltoyforum

I'm curious. Outside of primates are there any animals that have fingernails or toenails? I realise many animals have unguals with a keratin sheath, but I'm thinking more along the lines of animals that lack unguals but still have a keratin covering, like we do. Maybe primates are unique in this regards?


sbell

Quote from: animaltoyforum on November 22, 2016, 10:17:45 PM
I'm curious. Outside of primates are there any animals that have fingernails or toenails? I realise many animals have unguals with a keratin sheath, but I'm thinking more along the lines of animals that lack unguals but still have a keratin covering, like we do. Maybe primates are unique in this regards?

I seem to recall it (from my Anthropology days) being one of the defining traits of all primates. Not much to distinguish an order on...!

animaltoyforum

Quote from: sbell on November 23, 2016, 04:07:27 AM
Quote from: animaltoyforum on November 22, 2016, 10:17:45 PM
I'm curious. Outside of primates are there any animals that have fingernails or toenails? I realise many animals have unguals with a keratin sheath, but I'm thinking more along the lines of animals that lack unguals but still have a keratin covering, like we do. Maybe primates are unique in this regards?

I seem to recall it (from my Anthropology days) being one of the defining traits of all primates. Not much to distinguish an order on...!

What about elephants? Are their 'claws' attached to the bone, or superficial?


sbell

Quote from: animaltoyforum on November 23, 2016, 01:33:50 PM
Quote from: sbell on November 23, 2016, 04:07:27 AM
Quote from: animaltoyforum on November 22, 2016, 10:17:45 PM
I'm curious. Outside of primates are there any animals that have fingernails or toenails? I realise many animals have unguals with a keratin sheath, but I'm thinking more along the lines of animals that lack unguals but still have a keratin covering, like we do. Maybe primates are unique in this regards?

I seem to recall it (from my Anthropology days) being one of the defining traits of all primates. Not much to distinguish an order on...!

What about elephants? Are their 'claws' attached to the bone, or superficial?

From a quick search, elephant 'nails' area apparently cornified shields--they aren't connected to the toes.

bmathison1972

Quote from: sbell on November 23, 2016, 01:45:04 PM
Quote from: animaltoyforum on November 23, 2016, 01:33:50 PM
Quote from: sbell on November 23, 2016, 04:07:27 AM
Quote from: animaltoyforum on November 22, 2016, 10:17:45 PM
I'm curious. Outside of primates are there any animals that have fingernails or toenails? I realise many animals have unguals with a keratin sheath, but I'm thinking more along the lines of animals that lack unguals but still have a keratin covering, like we do. Maybe primates are unique in this regards?

I seem to recall it (from my Anthropology days) being one of the defining traits of all primates. Not much to distinguish an order on...!

What about elephants? Are their 'claws' attached to the bone, or superficial?

From a quick search, elephant 'nails' area apparently cornified shields--they aren't connected to the toes.

They also have four knees. Wierdos. Lol  :P

stemturtle

#5
Quote from: animaltoyforum on November 22, 2016, 10:17:45 PM
I'm curious. Outside of primates are there any animals that have fingernails or toenails? I realise many animals have unguals with a keratin sheath, but I'm thinking more along the lines of animals that lack unguals but still have a keratin covering, like we do. Maybe primates are unique in this regards?

An internet search turned up this detail about opossums. I cannot vouch for it.

Didelphidae
, opossums "...all digits except the first toe on the hindfoot have claws (it has a nail)."

Edit: The previous reference to the Virginia opossum is incorrect. That species does not have a toenail. However species in South America may provide an example of a nonprimate with a rear toenail.
Comparing woolly opossums to primates, ..."only the big toes have nails in the marsupials- all the other digits bear their original claws."
Reference:  Restless Creatures: The Story of Life in Ten Movements.


animaltoyforum

Quote from: sbell on November 23, 2016, 01:45:04 PM
Quote from: animaltoyforum on November 23, 2016, 01:33:50 PM
Quote from: sbell on November 23, 2016, 04:07:27 AM
Quote from: animaltoyforum on November 22, 2016, 10:17:45 PM
I'm curious. Outside of primates are there any animals that have fingernails or toenails? I realise many animals have unguals with a keratin sheath, but I'm thinking more along the lines of animals that lack unguals but still have a keratin covering, like we do. Maybe primates are unique in this regards?

I seem to recall it (from my Anthropology days) being one of the defining traits of all primates. Not much to distinguish an order on...!

What about elephants? Are their 'claws' attached to the bone, or superficial?

From a quick search, elephant 'nails' area apparently cornified shields--they aren't connected to the toes.

Cornified shields? Keratin, right? They might not be connected to the toes, but they are adjacent to them. I think it counts! I don't mind if they aren't homologous to primate nails, so long as they are analagous. 


stargatedalek

A bit wandering I know, but I'm curious while this topic is in discussion what of early reptiles like Hylonomus or Westlothiana? When transitioning from amphibian digits to "reptilian" claws would the result have been similar?

animaltoyforum

Quote from: stargatedalek on November 24, 2016, 12:57:35 AM
A bit wandering I know, but I'm curious while this topic is in discussion what of early reptiles like Hylonomus or Westlothiana? When transitioning from amphibian digits to "reptilian" claws would the result have been similar?

Well, the reason behind me asking about this in the first place was because I wondered whether dinosaurs could've had nails, even those without unguals. So, the condition in early reptiles interests me too!