Monthly archives: March, 2020

African Leopard, 2007 (Wild Life by Schleich)

Review and images by spacelab; edited by bmathison1972 The Leopard. One of the most iconic wild-life animals and without a doubt one of the prettiest predators in the world. A wild cat with beautiful body structure, power and flexibility, that became a cult symbol, having also enormous presence in the pop/rock culture, especially in the …

Alpine Salamander (NaturimBild.at)

Review and photos by Lanthanotus; edited by bmathison1972 Being new to the blog I decided to go with something very European… [editor’s note: Lanthanotus may be new to the Animal Toy Blog, but he is a regular reviewer for the Dinosaur Toy Blog] The Alpine Salamander (Salamandra atra) is a livebearing, totally terrestrial species restricted …

Dubia Roach (Micky Maus by Egmont Ehapa Publishing Company)

Micky Maus is a biweekly comic book series featuring Disney characters. It is published in Germany by the Egmont Ehapa Publishing Company. Some (all?) issues come with a toy of sorts and the February 7, 2020 issue came with large rubber cockroach. I have forum member widukind to thank for securing me a copy and …

Red Fox, 2008 (Wild Safari North American Wildlife by Safari Ltd.)

Review and images by Suspsy; edited by bmathison1972 What it lacks in size and strength, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) more than makes up for in cunning and versatility. It is one of the most widespread of all canids, occurring naturally throughout North America, Europe, and Asia, and as an invasive species in Australia. Unlike …

Red Kangaroo, female with joey (Wild Life by Schleich)

Review and photos by Suspsy; edited by bmathison1972 Kangaroo reproduction is truly astounding. A mother gives birth after only 33 days of gestation, upon which the jellybean-sized, underdeveloped neonate crawls blindly from the vagina to the pouch. Once inside, it latches on to a teat and continues to grow until it is finally ready to …

Tasmanian Devil (Wildlife by CollectA)

Review and photographs by Suspsy; edited by bmathison1972 Contrary to what was shown in Looney Toons, a Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) doesn’t have brown fur, doesn’t have a short muzzle or tufts of fur resembling horns, doesn’t walk upright, and doesn’t travel around by spinning rapidly like a tornado. But that’s not to say that …