Author Topic: Blaine's Bin Bugs  (Read 171 times)

bmathison1972

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Re: Blaine's Bin Bugs
« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2019, 03:01:08 AM »
Here is an interesting set of 12 figures from an unknown manufacturer. The figures are larger than standard bin tubes, almost comparable with Wild Safari-sized figures. Some unique sculpts and a few interesting species choices.

Because of their size, breaking them into two images. first the non-beetles:
cricket, cockroach, cicada, wasp, bee, spider



Next, the beetles:
tiger beetle (Cicindelinae), longhorned beetle, unknown beetle (I had always called this a buprestid, but not with much confidence; suggestions welcome!), lady bug, goliathine scarab (Trigonophorus rothschildi varians), dung beetle (Coprinae).

« Last Edit: January 03, 2019, 12:05:21 PM by bmathison1972 »


bmathison1972

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Re: Blaine's Bin Bugs
« Reply #21 on: January 03, 2019, 03:02:35 AM »
A set of six generic figures, utilizing sculpts seen many times over and over...

dragonfly, grylloblattid, mantis, ant cockroach, cricket


bmathison1972

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Re: Blaine's Bin Bugs
« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2019, 03:04:38 AM »
You can call whatever you want, I only said in what it was based. Looks like as if you feel molested by my comment!

After re-reading what I wrote I can see how it came across as harsh (a frequent dilemma when interpreting posts, emails, etc) but my comment about calling them what I want was meant to be jovial.  ^-^

bmathison1972

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Re: Blaine's Bin Bugs
« Reply #23 on: January 12, 2019, 03:01:20 PM »
Three accessory packs by Schleich.

First the 'Butterfly Set' from 2015. It has two butterflies and an agave-like plant. The butterflies are generic, but the paint application on the orange one looks as though it might have been influenced by the monarch, Danaus plexippus and the yellow one was influenced by a sulfur butterfly in the family Pieridae. Both are generic though (and I don't think either would be associated with this plant in nature, but don't hold me to that).



Next is the 'Death Valley Set', also from 2015. It has a scorpion, spider, millipede, and a cattle/bison skull. The millipede, which is quite well done given its small size, is a welcome change. There are several large, dark millipedes in the desert southwest, most in the orders Spirobolida and Spirostreptida. The spider and scorpion are too generic, although one could imagine the spider as the western widow, Latrodectus hesperus but it's lacking the red hourglass!



Thirdly is the 'Scorpion Nest' from 2016. The scorpion is the same model from the Death Valley Set and the 'nest' has been used multiple times with other figures for similarly-styled accessory packs.


stargatedalek

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Re: Blaine's Bin Bugs
« Reply #24 on: January 12, 2019, 06:32:19 PM »
I would say Emperor scorpion is a safe ID. The pitting on the claws and they're stubby nature are hard to place on another.

bmathison1972

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Re: Blaine's Bin Bugs
« Reply #25 on: January 12, 2019, 08:23:17 PM »
I would say Emperor scorpion is a safe ID. The pitting on the claws and they're stubby nature are hard to place on another.

Morphologically they do appear to be modeled after an emperor scorpion, but if the Death Valley set is true to it's name, emperor scorpions do not occur in North America  ;)