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Author Topic: Spotted Hyena Crocuta crocuta (Schleich #14735)  (Read 5476 times)

sbell

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Spotted Hyena Crocuta crocuta (Schleich #14735)
« on: January 31, 2015, 10:24:14 PM »
So it's not much of a secret that I'm usually less than enthusiastic about what Schleich gets up to these days. Part of it relates to what I tend to collect (I can easily say I have every freshwater fish from them... ;)). It's also no real secret that I am very enthusiastic about hyena figures; it's even the logo animal for my online store (it's http://faunafigures.com/. Yes, shameless plug. No, I don't carry Schleich; they aren't an easy company to deal with).

But it was a given that hyena>Schleich so as soon as the store in town had them, there I was. It does not disappoint.

Often I would give some background on the animal here--fossil history at least back to the Miocene; this species (Crocuta crocuta) has been around since at least the Pliocene in some form; the large subspecies Crocuta crocuta spelaea has been found in several Ice Age sites in Europe (so yes, throw them into your Pleistocene dioramas); they are predominantly African now, but were once more widespread through to the Middle East region; they are usually regarded as scavengers but are far more successful as social hunters; they are tireless cursorial hunters, running for several sustained kilometers to keep up with prey; by biomass they are the most common large carnivore on the African continent; they are also known as 'laughing hyenas' due to their loud, laugh-like sounds because they always get the joke and apparently humor is how they communicate over long distances; in short they rule.

Okay. So I did it anyway. In short form. But most of that is kind of well-known.

This is the fifth incarnation of hyena from Schleich (say whaaaatttt? some of you will say) and it is by far their best. It captures the heavy, powerful nature of these dog-like but cat-related predators and manages what is probably the best spotted hyena paint job yet (even more so than my other favorites, the Mojo and the Safari. I will not speak of the Papo cartoon). The colours run a very well-blended gamut of browns, tans and yellows with of course dark blotches and spots and excellent detail around the face--complete with bright, shiny black eyes that, on a real one close up, would be a terrible thing to see that clearly (I like them, but I'm not crazy).

It's also their largest hyena figure, 8.5cm along from nose-tip to base of tail, 3.5cm tall at the hip and just about 5cm at the shoulder. Scale is hard to determine because of the range seen in the species (70 -91.5cm at the shoulder) so anywhere from about 1:14 to 1:18, 1:20 if you want a female, I suppose, because they're bigger. And in this figure's case, it might be female--it's ambiguous, because of the weird genitalia of spotted hyenas. I'm not taking that photo. Get your own.

Well that's all well and good. Pictures?
Of course:

Standard right-side profile:

This view gives a really good sense of the animal's proportions. Heavy, large rear haunches, longer, thinner front limbs, and a thick, strong neck.

Right profile, somewhat raised:

Mostly the same image, although the colours are clearer in this one. The ventral darkening is more obvious (a little exaggerated by the flash).

Front view, raised up a bit:

A more head-on view. Show the broad head and big ears. Kind of a view you’d see if one walked up to you.

Front view, head-on (two photos):


A view into the mouth of the beast. The next thing you'd see after it walked up to you? Hopefully not. It's funny just how black the eyes went, although it's pretty true to the figure, except they are very shiny. From this angle, you can see the detailed sculpting of the lower canines. But picky me--the incisors are not separated (should be 3 per quadrant for 6 top and bottom).  The molars and premolars are sculpted as 4 in each quadrant, but are not well-differentiated, especially the massive carnassials (mammal tooth nerd!). There should be a 'fifth' in the uppers anyway. I'd be more forgiving if they hadn't proven that it could easily be done on the short-lived gladiator figure (the numbers are wrong, the incisors are non-existent, but the cusps of the carnassials are clearly visible).

Oblique front left-side view:

Another great way to see the power sculpted into the neck and shoulders. The slope of the back is also really clear here.

Profile, left side:

So now the hyena is just ignoring us, or saw something more interesting over there. But the colours actually turned out pretty well here, showing the blends among the browns, yellows and tans, with the darker highlights in the mane and legs.

Back/rear view:

Another good way to see the paint job on this figure, as it has apparently become entirely bored with us and is walking away.

Right rear oblique view:

It's coming back! And now the big canines are clearer. It's funny, but at this angle the bend in the next isn't as obvious. It looks almost short.

And why did it come back?

Family photo!


At the back , from left to right

1 - The current spotted hyena
2 - The first-version REPAINT from 2005 (Art#14347)
3 - The ORIGINAL version from 1997-1999 (Art#14139--and no, I'm not letting that go)
4 -The short-lived  Gladiator hyena with spiked collar from Fall 2013 and retired within two months (Art#70079--available online for only $69.95--please don't do that).

2 & 3 were probably the first widely available, decent hyena models (I have a Bully of similar age, and a couple of AAA, but they aren't quite the same). But the influence of a certain African-themed animated film from a certain mouse-inspired company is pretty clear, especially given what we have now.

And finally, up front, the only Brown hyena made by anybody--a minitiere from 1965-1996 (obviously, mine is from closer to 1996), Art#10059. It's not labelled as a brown, of course--but the mane and proportions preclude a spotted, and it has some brown paint on the mane, so I'm sticking with that.

So now go get your hyena. Make Schleich feel like making other hyena species.

But I was wrong about why this guy was distracted. A friend came home from the store with him (it was a free gift):

I have named him Jimmy. I don't know if he has an official name or not, but that's what I will call him. The stick is 3cm in a straight line tip to tip, if you'd like a scale.

He and the hyena are friends. Look how the hyena is coming to see Jimmy!


Get the stick hyena! Jimmy will play with you!


Grrr! Tug of war with a 150lb hyena is a good idea! Jimmy is smart!


Oops. Jimmy fell--I guess an 65lb kid isn't quite strong enough for this game (my 60 lb dog once dragged my 35 lb daughter down our driveway--it's only funny now because she's okay and because she doesn't know I'm writing this).


Look, hyena senses Jimmy's weakness and is very likely going to make sure he's okay. I'll stop here because I'm sure everything will be fine.


If only because Jimmy will almost need to show up elsewhere. His sizing is hilariously about right for all manner of figures. ;D
« Last Edit: January 31, 2015, 10:29:14 PM by sbell »


bmathison1972

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Re: Spotted Hyena Crocuta crocuta (Schleich #14735)
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2015, 11:02:52 PM »
I'm in the same boat with Schleich--they just dont have the critters I collect...

brontodocus

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Re: Spotted Hyena Crocuta crocuta (Schleich #14735)
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2015, 12:48:25 PM »
Brilliant photos and walk-around, Sean! :) Generally, I'm not overly fond of Schleich, either, even though they are ubiquitous here in Germany. But they sometimes prove that they can still make amazing figures (last year's American Bison, for example). Seems the new spotted Hyena has the same highly detailed fur texture we've seen in many recent Schleich figures. And I don't think it's too picky to demand more or less correct dentition in an open-mouth figure of a carnivore. It's not that difficult to access correct information and there are lots of other carnivoran figures showing e.g. the correct number of incisors. Level of detail, especially pointiness of teeth, is a different thing, though, and I believe Schleich deliberately makes their figures' teeth rather on the blunt side. Maybe because of child safety they would not make a figure as pointy as e.g. the horns of the CollectA Markhor, although it seems Schleich is sometimes overcautious in this respect.

sbell

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Re: Spotted Hyena Crocuta crocuta (Schleich #14735)
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2015, 03:22:49 PM »
Brilliant photos and walk-around, Sean! :) Generally, I'm not overly fond of Schleich, either, even though they are ubiquitous here in Germany. But they sometimes prove that they can still make amazing figures (last year's American Bison, for example). Seems the new spotted Hyena has the same highly detailed fur texture we've seen in many recent Schleich figures. And I don't think it's too picky to demand more or less correct dentition in an open-mouth figure of a carnivore. It's not that difficult to access correct information and there are lots of other carnivoran figures showing e.g. the correct number of incisors. Level of detail, especially pointiness of teeth, is a different thing, though, and I believe Schleich deliberately makes their figures' teeth rather on the blunt side. Maybe because of child safety they would not make a figure as pointy as e.g. the horns of the CollectA Markhor, although it seems Schleich is sometimes overcautious in this respect.

I should have taken a very-close-up of the gladiator hyena teeth (I'll do that soon, but it's going to be tough to get a clear one). While the numbers are wrong (which, maybe, can be explained in a back story if someone is creative), it definitely shows how easy it is to make the individual important teeth look more or less correct.

And over here in Canada, Schleich is pretty much the ubiquitous company as well. One other reason I didn't bother bringing them into my store!

sbell

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Re: Spotted Hyena Crocuta crocuta (Schleich #14735)
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2015, 11:15:34 PM »
And now I have close up photos of said teeth. As best as I could get:

Gladiator hyena:


2015 hyena:


I didn't get the incisors in there. They are almost non-existent in the gladiator model. Maybe he got bit too many times? Might explain the angry mohawk hair.

Jetoar

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Re: Spotted Hyena Crocuta crocuta (Schleich #14735)
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2015, 11:05:54 AM »
Brilliant photos and walk-around, Sean! :) Generally, I'm not overly fond of Schleich, either, even though they are ubiquitous here in Germany. But they sometimes prove that they can still make amazing figures (last year's American Bison, for example). Seems the new spotted Hyena has the same highly detailed fur texture we've seen in many recent Schleich figures. And I don't think it's too picky to demand more or less correct dentition in an open-mouth figure of a carnivore. It's not that difficult to access correct information and there are lots of other carnivoran figures showing e.g. the correct number of incisors. Level of detail, especially pointiness of teeth, is a different thing, though, and I believe Schleich deliberately makes their figures' teeth rather on the blunt side. Maybe because of child safety they would not make a figure as pointy as e.g. the horns of the CollectA Markhor, although it seems Schleich is sometimes overcautious in this respect.

I should have taken a very-close-up of the gladiator hyena teeth (I'll do that soon, but it's going to be tough to get a clear one). While the numbers are wrong (which, maybe, can be explained in a back story if someone is creative), it definitely shows how easy it is to make the individual important teeth look more or less correct.

And over here in Canada, Schleich is pretty much the ubiquitous company as well. One other reason I didn't bother bringing them into my store!

I think the same that you friends, teeth will be better and I know the teeth of hyenas because I work with them. In Spain we have the same situation with Schleich. Bullyland is the most hidden brand and Safari doesnt exist.
My website: Paleo-Creatures
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sbell

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Re: Spotted Hyena Crocuta crocuta (Schleich #14735)
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2015, 01:45:57 PM »
Brilliant photos and walk-around, Sean! :) Generally, I'm not overly fond of Schleich, either, even though they are ubiquitous here in Germany. But they sometimes prove that they can still make amazing figures (last year's American Bison, for example). Seems the new spotted Hyena has the same highly detailed fur texture we've seen in many recent Schleich figures. And I don't think it's too picky to demand more or less correct dentition in an open-mouth figure of a carnivore. It's not that difficult to access correct information and there are lots of other carnivoran figures showing e.g. the correct number of incisors. Level of detail, especially pointiness of teeth, is a different thing, though, and I believe Schleich deliberately makes their figures' teeth rather on the blunt side. Maybe because of child safety they would not make a figure as pointy as e.g. the horns of the CollectA Markhor, although it seems Schleich is sometimes overcautious in this respect.

I should have taken a very-close-up of the gladiator hyena teeth (I'll do that soon, but it's going to be tough to get a clear one). While the numbers are wrong (which, maybe, can be explained in a back story if someone is creative), it definitely shows how easy it is to make the individual important teeth look more or less correct.

And over here in Canada, Schleich is pretty much the ubiquitous company as well. One other reason I didn't bother bringing them into my store!

I think the same that you friends, teeth will be better and I know the teeth of hyenas because I work with them. In Spain we have the same situation with Schleich. Bullyland is the most hidden brand and Safari doesnt exist.

What do you do that you get to work with hyenas? Because that is so cool!

Jetoar

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Re: Spotted Hyena Crocuta crocuta (Schleich #14735)
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2015, 02:01:30 PM »
Brilliant photos and walk-around, Sean! :) Generally, I'm not overly fond of Schleich, either, even though they are ubiquitous here in Germany. But they sometimes prove that they can still make amazing figures (last year's American Bison, for example). Seems the new spotted Hyena has the same highly detailed fur texture we've seen in many recent Schleich figures. And I don't think it's too picky to demand more or less correct dentition in an open-mouth figure of a carnivore. It's not that difficult to access correct information and there are lots of other carnivoran figures showing e.g. the correct number of incisors. Level of detail, especially pointiness of teeth, is a different thing, though, and I believe Schleich deliberately makes their figures' teeth rather on the blunt side. Maybe because of child safety they would not make a figure as pointy as e.g. the horns of the CollectA Markhor, although it seems Schleich is sometimes overcautious in this respect.

I should have taken a very-close-up of the gladiator hyena teeth (I'll do that soon, but it's going to be tough to get a clear one). While the numbers are wrong (which, maybe, can be explained in a back story if someone is creative), it definitely shows how easy it is to make the individual important teeth look more or less correct.

And over here in Canada, Schleich is pretty much the ubiquitous company as well. One other reason I didn't bother bringing them into my store!

I think the same that you friends, teeth will be better and I know the teeth of hyenas because I work with them. In Spain we have the same situation with Schleich. Bullyland is the most hidden brand and Safari doesnt exist.

What do you do that you get to work with hyenas? Because that is so cool!

I am arqueologist and I am doing zooarqueology nowadays. I one of a digging site that I dig, we have pleistocen spotted hyena bones and I studied its teeth  ^-^.
My website: Paleo-Creatures
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sbell

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Re: Spotted Hyena Crocuta crocuta (Schleich #14735)
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2015, 12:34:42 AM »
Brilliant photos and walk-around, Sean! :) Generally, I'm not overly fond of Schleich, either, even though they are ubiquitous here in Germany. But they sometimes prove that they can still make amazing figures (last year's American Bison, for example). Seems the new spotted Hyena has the same highly detailed fur texture we've seen in many recent Schleich figures. And I don't think it's too picky to demand more or less correct dentition in an open-mouth figure of a carnivore. It's not that difficult to access correct information and there are lots of other carnivoran figures showing e.g. the correct number of incisors. Level of detail, especially pointiness of teeth, is a different thing, though, and I believe Schleich deliberately makes their figures' teeth rather on the blunt side. Maybe because of child safety they would not make a figure as pointy as e.g. the horns of the CollectA Markhor, although it seems Schleich is sometimes overcautious in this respect.

I should have taken a very-close-up of the gladiator hyena teeth (I'll do that soon, but it's going to be tough to get a clear one). While the numbers are wrong (which, maybe, can be explained in a back story if someone is creative), it definitely shows how easy it is to make the individual important teeth look more or less correct.

And over here in Canada, Schleich is pretty much the ubiquitous company as well. One other reason I didn't bother bringing them into my store!

I think the same that you friends, teeth will be better and I know the teeth of hyenas because I work with them. In Spain we have the same situation with Schleich. Bullyland is the most hidden brand and Safari doesnt exist.

What do you do that you get to work with hyenas? Because that is so cool!

I am arqueologist and I am doing zooarqueology nowadays. I one of a digging site that I dig, we have pleistocen spotted hyena bones and I studied its teeth  ^-^.

That's very cool. We get very few hyena bones in North America. And none in the archeological sites.

Jetoar

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Re: Spotted Hyena Crocuta crocuta (Schleich #14735)
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2015, 11:34:28 AM »
Brilliant photos and walk-around, Sean! :) Generally, I'm not overly fond of Schleich, either, even though they are ubiquitous here in Germany. But they sometimes prove that they can still make amazing figures (last year's American Bison, for example). Seems the new spotted Hyena has the same highly detailed fur texture we've seen in many recent Schleich figures. And I don't think it's too picky to demand more or less correct dentition in an open-mouth figure of a carnivore. It's not that difficult to access correct information and there are lots of other carnivoran figures showing e.g. the correct number of incisors. Level of detail, especially pointiness of teeth, is a different thing, though, and I believe Schleich deliberately makes their figures' teeth rather on the blunt side. Maybe because of child safety they would not make a figure as pointy as e.g. the horns of the CollectA Markhor, although it seems Schleich is sometimes overcautious in this respect.

I should have taken a very-close-up of the gladiator hyena teeth (I'll do that soon, but it's going to be tough to get a clear one). While the numbers are wrong (which, maybe, can be explained in a back story if someone is creative), it definitely shows how easy it is to make the individual important teeth look more or less correct.

And over here in Canada, Schleich is pretty much the ubiquitous company as well. One other reason I didn't bother bringing them into my store!

I think the same that you friends, teeth will be better and I know the teeth of hyenas because I work with them. In Spain we have the same situation with Schleich. Bullyland is the most hidden brand and Safari doesnt exist.

What do you do that you get to work with hyenas? Because that is so cool!

I am arqueologist and I am doing zooarqueology nowadays. I one of a digging site that I dig, we have pleistocen spotted hyena bones and I studied its teeth  ^-^.

That's very cool. We get very few hyena bones in North America. And none in the archeological sites.

In the case of Europe, overall Spain, Hyenas lived in the same areas that humans even, they did their dens near to humans or in the same caves that was used for the humans as haven.
My website: Paleo-Creatures
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