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avatar_Jetoar

Largetooth Sawfish (Collecta - Sea Life).

Started by Jetoar, April 17, 2014, 01:59:21 PM

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Jetoar

Hello friends, this is the figure of Largetooth  Sawfish (Pristis microdon) Latham, 1794 of Collecta - Sea Life. Total lenght is 160 mm. This figure was relased in 2014 and it is avaliable. The largetooth sawfish is a heavy-bodied sawfish with a short massive saw which is broad-based, strongly tapering and with 14 to 22 very large teeth on each side - the space between the last two saw-teeth on the sides are less than twice the space between the first two teeth. The pectoral fins are high and angular, the first dorsal fin being mostly in front of the pelvic fins, and the caudal fin has a pronounced lower lobe.












Collecta is a young brand of figures, but in his short time of existence, they have done a lot of figures of different species of animals (included rare species of dinosaurs and animals). In their cattegory of sea life, they have included the Largetooth  Sawfish. This figure is a nice representation of this animal. The colors are exact and the details are nice. I think that it is one of the best figures of this animal and good acquistion for pandas collectors. I bought this figure in a toy store of in Cádiz (Spain) one week ago ^-^.
My website: Paleo-Creatures
My website's facebook: Paleo-Creatures

Newt

Very nice figure!  I think if I owned it I would have to trim those teeth down a bit, but otherwise it's quite handsome.


I can still remember the sawfish I saw at Marineland in St. Augustine, Florida in the mid-1980s.  I was a very small child, and I remember nothing else about Marineland, but that sawfish made a big impression on me! According to Marineland's website, they are now strictly dolphin-focused.  Dolphins are OK, I guess, but they're no sawfish... :-\


Jetoar

Quote from: Newt on April 17, 2014, 02:27:01 PM
Very nice figure!  I think if I owned it I would have to trim those teeth down a bit, but otherwise it's quite handsome.


I can still remember the sawfish I saw at Marineland in St. Augustine, Florida in the mid-1980s.  I was a very small child, and I remember nothing else about Marineland, but that sawfish made a big impression on me! According to Marineland's website, they are now strictly dolphin-focused.  Dolphins are OK, I guess, but they're no sawfish... :-\

Thanks friend  ^-^. The size of the theets of the saw are differents depend of the especie of Saw Fish I believe  ^-^.
My website: Paleo-Creatures
My website's facebook: Paleo-Creatures

widukind

Thank you for sharing this pics and informations, now i know i will add this fish in my zoo :)

OkapiBoy

I just got mine and it's beautiful figure for sure!

Jetoar

Thanks friend, I think that it is one of the best figure of this specie and one of the best figures of Collecta of this year  ^-^.
My website: Paleo-Creatures
My website's facebook: Paleo-Creatures

sphyrna18

Great walkaround, Jetoar! This is definitely one of my favorite figures for 2014.  I would propose, though, that this is in fact a Freshwater Sawfish (Pristis microdon) as opposed to a Longcomb, or Green, Sawfish.  The Longcomb Sawfish has 24 to 28 pairs of teeth, spaced more closely together at the tip of the rostrum, which is slender and untapered.  Also, the origin of the first dorsal fin is behind the origin of the pelvic fins.

Freshwater Sawfish have 18 to 24 pairs of teeth evenly spaced along the rostrum, which is broad at the base and tapers to the end.  Pectoral fins are broadly triangular with broad bases; dorsal fins are tall and pointed. Also, the origin of the first dorsal fin is well in front of the origin of the pelvic fins.

Both Freshwater and Longcomb Sawfish are greenish in color (Longcomb: greenish-gray; Freshwater: olive/brown)

This figure more closely resembles a Freshwater Sawfish in many ways: the figure has only 15 pairs of teeth along the rostrum, which is closer to the Freshwater Sawfish's 18-24 than the Longcomb's 24-28.  Also, the figure's teeth are evenly spaced along the entire length of the rostrum, and the rostrum tapers toward the end.  The figure's pectoral fins and dorsal fins match the shape of a Freshwater Sawfish, as well.  But most importantly, for me, is that the first dorsal fin's origin is postitioned well before the origin of the pelvic fins.  The only thing that doesn't really fit with this figure being a Freshwater Sawfish is the figure's tail, which is not as distinctly lobed as it should be.  But I would say it is does have at least somewhat of a lower lobe, unlike a Longcomb Sawfish, which does not.

Regardless of species, this is a great figure!  Great walkaround and pictures, again.!

Jetoar

Quote from: sphyrna18 on April 23, 2014, 11:31:01 PM
Great walkaround, Jetoar! This is definitely one of my favorite figures for 2014.  I would propose, though, that this is in fact a Freshwater Sawfish (Pristis microdon) as opposed to a Longcomb, or Green, Sawfish.  The Longcomb Sawfish has 24 to 28 pairs of teeth, spaced more closely together at the tip of the rostrum, which is slender and untapered.  Also, the origin of the first dorsal fin is behind the origin of the pelvic fins.

Freshwater Sawfish have 18 to 24 pairs of teeth evenly spaced along the rostrum, which is broad at the base and tapers to the end.  Pectoral fins are broadly triangular with broad bases; dorsal fins are tall and pointed. Also, the origin of the first dorsal fin is well in front of the origin of the pelvic fins.

Both Freshwater and Longcomb Sawfish are greenish in color (Longcomb: greenish-gray; Freshwater: olive/brown)

This figure more closely resembles a Freshwater Sawfish in many ways: the figure has only 15 pairs of teeth along the rostrum, which is closer to the Freshwater Sawfish's 18-24 than the Longcomb's 24-28.  Also, the figure's teeth are evenly spaced along the entire length of the rostrum, and the rostrum tapers toward the end.  The figure's pectoral fins and dorsal fins match the shape of a Freshwater Sawfish, as well.  But most importantly, for me, is that the first dorsal fin's origin is postitioned well before the origin of the pelvic fins.  The only thing that doesn't really fit with this figure being a Freshwater Sawfish is the figure's tail, which is not as distinctly lobed as it should be.  But I would say it is does have at least somewhat of a lower lobe, unlike a Longcomb Sawfish, which does not.

Regardless of species, this is a great figure!  Great walkaround and pictures, again.!

Thanks friend for your information and I have decided to change the name, because I believe the same that you  ^-^.
My website: Paleo-Creatures
My website's facebook: Paleo-Creatures

brontodocus

So we get two nice Largetooth Sawfish figures by major companies this year! 8)
I have the figure, too, and I came to the same results Chad pointed out. It's funny that the new Schleich Sawfish also shows characters typical for Pristis microdon (with an even more pronounced lower lobe of the caudal fin) but Schleich's website officially identifies it as P. zijsron. Admittedly, the differences of species within the genus Pristis are subtle and it has been suggested recently to lump P. pristis, P. microdon, and P. perotteti into a single species, P. pristis (the latter would have priority because it was described earlier than the other two).

Jetoar

Quote from: brontodocus on April 25, 2014, 09:21:34 AM
So we get two nice Largetooth Sawfish figures by major companies this year! 8)
I have the figure, too, and I came to the same results Chad pointed out. It's funny that the new Schleich Sawfish also shows characters typical for Pristis microdon (with an even more pronounced lower lobe of the caudal fin) but Schleich's website officially identifies it as P. zijsron. Admittedly, the differences of species within the genus Pristis are subtle and it has been suggested recently to lump P. pristis, P. microdon, and P. perotteti into a single species, P. pristis (the latter would have priority because it was described earlier than the other two).

Thanks for your information André, definetly this is year is the Sawfish year  ^-^.
My website: Paleo-Creatures
My website's facebook: Paleo-Creatures

widukind

Quote from: Jetoar on April 25, 2014, 10:12:52 AM
Quote from: brontodocus on April 25, 2014, 09:21:34 AM
So we get two nice Largetooth Sawfish figures by major companies this year! 8)
I have the figure, too, and I came to the same results Chad pointed out. It's funny that the new Schleich Sawfish also shows characters typical for Pristis microdon (with an even more pronounced lower lobe of the caudal fin) but Schleich's website officially identifies it as P. zijsron. Admittedly, the differences of species within the genus Pristis are subtle and it has been suggested recently to lump P. pristis, P. microdon, and P. perotteti into a single species, P. pristis (the latter would have priority because it was described earlier than the other two).

Thanks for your information André, definetly this is year is the Sawfish year  ^-^.

Yeah, i dont saw it before but now both for my zoo  :)