Author Topic: Bryozoan  (Read 2490 times)

stemturtle

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Bryozoan
« on: July 06, 2014, 10:41:34 PM »

Bryozoan

If you are interested in weird animals, this photo is for you. I am not aware of a toy moss animal, phylum Ectoprocta. 
The photo is of a live colony lifted out of a lake in Minnesota along the shoreline.  The colony was attached to the stem of a shrub.
The gelatinous matrix is about the size of a grapefruit.  Most bryozoan species are marine.



stargatedalek

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Re: Bryozoan
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2014, 10:57:42 PM »
we get some of the marine forms here, invasive too

could certainly make for an interesting piece
and it fits so many settings, it could be scenery, invasive species awareness, etc.
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brontodocus

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Re: Bryozoan
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2014, 11:14:12 PM »
Brilliant idea for a thread, stemturtle! :) I believe sessile, colonial animals with individuals often less than a millimeter in diameter are too obscure for most manufacturers (but thinking about what Japanese brands sometimes do, there may be a chance to see a bryozoan figure, eventually). Oh, and of course I should mention one of the most famous bryozoan fossils, the "Hamburger Bryozoenchor" which would translate into "bryozoan choir of Hamburg" (from the late cretaceous):

stemturtle

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Re: Bryozoan
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2014, 02:25:22 PM »

Ordovician Bryozoan Fossils

Thanks for your replies, stargatedalek and brontodocus. 
I appreciate the amusing photo of the "Bryozoan choir of Hamburg."

The photo above shows fossil bryozoans found in Minnesota.
These fossils motivated my interest in the living creatures.

stargatedalek

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Re: Bryozoan
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2014, 02:34:19 PM »
there is so much variety amongst colony formations ^-^
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Newt

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Re: Bryozoan
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2014, 04:29:25 PM »
I think the live one is Pectinatella magnifica.  Senescent colonies wash up on the shores of my local reservoir every fall- sometimes a foot long.  I've never found a live one in situ.


My favorite fossil bryozoan is Archimedes:


http://www.indiana9fossils.com/Bryozoa/Illinois/11-20/lg10a.JPG

widukind

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Re: Bryozoan
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2014, 06:28:48 PM »
Very interesting, i also have a collection of fossils  :)

stemturtle

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Re: Bryozoan
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2014, 06:49:58 PM »
I think the live one is Pectinatella magnifica.  Senescent colonies wash up on the shores of my local reservoir every fall- sometimes a foot long.  I've never found a live one in situ. ...

Thanks for your magnificent identification, Newt.
Pectinatella magnifica has been reported in Minnesota.

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