Author Topic: Salamanders and frogs  (Read 1751 times)

Owen Leo

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Salamanders and frogs
« on: March 09, 2016, 10:23:22 AM »
Guys, I just read several interesting facts about Salamanders that i think are worth sharing with you.:

1. The name Salamander comes from the Greek word for Fire Lizard. This name came about when salamanders came running out of the logs they   had been hiding in when those logs were thrown on a fire.
2. Salamanders are nocturnal.
3. Some salamander species can be poisonous and some even have teeth.
4. Some salamanders and frogs have tongues up to 10 times as long as their bodies.
5. The largest salamander in the world in the Chinese Giant Salamander. It can grow to a length of 5 feet.
6. The Americas are home to more species of salamander than the entire rest of the world combined.
How many were you already aware of?



Beetle guy

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Re: Salamanders and frogs
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2016, 01:58:17 PM »
Guys, I just read several interesting facts about Salamanders that i think are worth sharing with you.:

1. The name Salamander comes from the Greek word for Fire Lizard. This name came about when salamanders came running out of the logs they   had been hiding in when those logs were thrown on a fire.
2. Salamanders are nocturnal.
3. Some salamander species can be poisonous and some even have teeth.
4. Some salamanders and frogs have tongues up to 10 times as long as their bodies.
5. The largest salamander in the world in the Chinese Giant Salamander. It can grow to a length of 5 feet.
6. The Americas are home to more species of salamander than the entire rest of the world combined.
How many were you already aware of?

Thanks! Interesting to know.
 I have made our garden at home an interesting one for birds, amfibians and insects. The pond in my garden is home to three Salamander species.Triturus cristatus, Triturus vulgaris and Triturus alpestris.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2016, 01:59:04 PM by Beetle guy »
To beetle or not to beetle.

Owen Leo

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Re: Salamanders and frogs
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2016, 07:54:01 AM »
Wow, that's great. Do you basically stay home most of the time to take care of your pets or you've employed people to do it? Cause from the look of things your pets are numerous and require much attention.

sphyrna18

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Re: Salamanders and frogs
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2016, 01:54:07 AM »
Guys, I just read several interesting facts about Salamanders that i think are worth sharing with you.:

1. The name Salamander comes from the Greek word for Fire Lizard. This name came about when salamanders came running out of the logs they   had been hiding in when those logs were thrown on a fire.
2. Salamanders are nocturnal.
3. Some salamander species can be poisonous and some even have teeth.
4. Some salamanders and frogs have tongues up to 10 times as long as their bodies.
5. The largest salamander in the world in the Chinese Giant Salamander. It can grow to a length of 5 feet.
6. The Americas are home to more species of salamander than the entire rest of the world combined.
How many were you already aware of?

Thanks! Interesting to know.
 I have made our garden at home an interesting one for birds, amfibians and insects. The pond in my garden is home to three Salamander species.Triturus cristatus, Triturus vulgaris and Triturus alpestris.

Wow, that's great. Do you basically stay home most of the time to take care of your pets or you've employed people to do it? Cause from the look of things your pets are numerous and require much attention.

Interesting facts, Owen. I was aware of most of those (not that some salamanders have teeth or about their tongues), but valuable info and it's great that you've shared it.  However, I don't think Beetle Guy was referring to those species as pets; rather, it seems he has designed his yard and garden to be very, very wildlife friendly, and he employs ecologically sound gardening practices to keep wildlife healthy.  The animals making their homes in his garden or using his yard are in no way pets, I don't think (correct me if I'm wrong, Beetle Guy); they are entirely wild, so he doesn't take care of them in the way you would a pet.

Great info about the salamanders, though.  Are you particularly interested in salamanders? Any species in particular?

Lee_low

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Re: Salamanders and frogs
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2016, 04:18:20 AM »
I'm interested to know more about Salamanders though I'm quite afraid of them because they are typically characterized by a lizard like appearance though much bigger in size.



Newt

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Re: Salamanders and frogs
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2016, 01:40:04 AM »
Hello, Lee-low! I will be happy to talk to you about salamanders!


First, there is no need to be afraid of salamanders. Most species are quite harmless. A few of the larger ones, such as amphiumas and Asian giant salamanders, can bite hard enough to break the skin, but these are aquatic species that you are unlikely to run into unless you are really searching for them. Other salamanders secrete poison from glands in their skin, but as long as you don't try to eat them, and wash your hands if you touch one, they won't hurt you either.


The majority of salamanders are small. Most salamander species are under 8 inches (20 cm) in total length. Several species of Thorius and Desmognathus are only about 2 inches (5 cm) in length, similar in size to the smallest lizards. A few terrestrial and semi-aquatic salamanders in the families Ambystomatidae, Plethodonotidae, and Salamandridae may reach 12 inches (30 cm) in length or a little more - still rather small compared to many lizards. The only bigger salamanders are permanently aquatic, larviform species in the families Amphiumidae, Cryptobranchidae, Proteidae, and Sirenidae.


Where do you live? I can help you learn which salamanders live in your area, if you like. *EDIT* I see from your introductory post that you are from the Philippines - a country with much wonderful wildlife, but sadly lacking in salamanders. Do you see many salamanders in the pet trade there?
« Last Edit: October 21, 2016, 01:43:49 AM by Newt »