Animal toy reviews and walk-arounds

Recent reviews and walk-arounds


postsaurischian
Today at 02:40:57 PM by postsaurischian
Views: 24 | Comments: 0


                                                 Kaiyodo Reptiles Lounge ~ Chlamydosaurus kingiiFrilled Lizard

                                             

                                             



                                             

                                             



                                             

                         


                                                             Measured along the spine the figure is 9 cm long.
                                                              The 1:10 human scale figure stands 18 cm tall.

                         


                                                                          the complete set (from left to right):
        Conolophus subcristatus - Galapagos Land Iguana, Varanus komodoensis - Komodo Dragon, Chlamydosaurus kingii - Frilled Lizard
                                                Moloch horridus - Thorny Devil, Amblyrhynchus cristatus - Marine Iguana
               

bmathison1972
April 20, 2017, 01:46:21 AM by bmathison1972
Views: 133 | Comments: 1

Review of the COMPLETE set of Barnacles, by Kitan Club - Nature Techni Colour (2012). I was happy to finally get the complete set. I previously had 6 figures representing one species each, but the complete set is 18 figures representing nine species! To my knowledge, this set represents the only barnacles in toy/figure form.

Some are solid figures, some are magnets, some are straps, and some are pins to be worn.

The first figure shows the complete set to get an idea how the sizes compare among the species.

I am writing the species' coverage in the Bug of the Day format, so I only have to cut-and-paste into that thread  C:-).

Enjoy!

the whole set:

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I. Balanus rostratus.
There are four figures here. Three combine together to form a cluster (with magnets inside them to help hold them close), and the fourth is a strap figure (that I removed the strap to make a cluster of four).

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II. Japanese goose barnacle, Capitulum mitella.
Two figures, independent and different figures with internal magnets.

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III. Turtle barnacle, Chelonibia testudinaria.
Two figures, of the same sculpt; one is a solid figure and one is a pin.

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IV. Conchoderma virgatum.
One figure, a strap figure (for which I removed the strap).

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V. Fistulobalanus albicostatus.
Two figures, both with magnets. [marketed as Amphibalanus albicostatus.]

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VI. Megabalanus rosa.
Two figures. One is a pin but the other is remarkable: it is split down the center revealing a cross-section of the internal anatomy! Truly the most amazing in the set for this reason!

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VII. Thatched barnacle, Semibalanus cariosus.
Two small figures, both with magnets.

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VIII. Scapellum stearnsi.
One figure, a strap figure (and displayed on a marine snail shell), for which I removed the strap.

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IX. Japanese acorn barnacle, Tetraclita japonica.
Two figures, one a regular solid figure and one a pin to wear.

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bmathison1972
March 10, 2017, 07:02:14 PM by bmathison1972
Views: 269 | Comments: 1

Walk-around of the velvet spider, Eresus kollari Rossi, 1846, by Bullyland, new for 2017. The species is distributed from Europe to Central Asia and was previously considered part of the E. niger-complex. To my knowledge this is the only figure of a member of the family Eresidae and honestly one I have always secretly wanted to be made! The figure might represent E. moravicus, but I think E. kollari is the more logical choice.

The figure is painted to depict a male and is 40 mm long (not including appendages), making it slightly larger than 3:1. It is solid, firm piece of PVC with slightly softer legs (not as soft as the Papo wolf spider legs, however).

This unique figure comes highly recommended!

One to the pics!

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bmathison1972
March 09, 2017, 05:00:33 PM by bmathison1972
Views: 327 | Comments: 1

Walk-around of the larva of the Asian swallowtail, Papilio xuthus Linnaeus, 1767, by Kaiyodo - Sofubi Toy Box, No. 007, new for 2017. This figure was released early this year and has already been discontinued, so grab one while you can.

The species is common in much of Asia, from Japan to India, also the Hawaiian Islands. The figure has been made several times, including another caterpillar by Kaiyodo (Capsule Q Museum - Caterpillars), and adults by Bandai (Bugs Museum; Insect Science), Kabaya (World Insects Series I), and Rement. See the last image for comparisons with the Capsule Q caterpillar and the Insect Science adult.

The figure. WOW. It measures 23 cm long. Assuming the Capsule Q Museum version is 1:1, that makes this figure 4:1 (although it seems much bigger - someone can confirm my math if they want). The figure, unlike others in this series, is solid piece with no moving parts.

I have updated BOTD to reflect thus guy as well!

On to the pics:

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bmathison1972
March 03, 2017, 01:25:45 AM by bmathison1972
Views: 178 | Comments: 1

Review of the complete set of Jumbo Insects by Learning Resources. Taking the forum back to its roots to examine a set of actual TOYS! Yes, the figures in this set are specifically designed to be educational toys for children.

There are seven figures, all large (size comparable to K&M Polyvinyl Bag or Safari LTD Hidden Kingdom figures), solid-piece PVC figures. While they are all fairly generic, the sculpts are not duplicates of anything else I have seen or have. The figures come in a sturdy cardboard carrying case and are accompanied by a pamphlet with 'fun facts' for kids to learn more about the largest group of animals on the planet!

The figures represent a butterfly (presumably a monarch), lady beetle, bee, fly, ant, dragonfly, and grasshopper (I am particularly fond of the ant and grasshopper).

Normally, when I review a set, I recommend it for the superior quality or interesting species choices. This time I cannot give such recommendations. The only people that might be interested in this set are 1) those with children interested in the natural world or 2) entomologists that like to have representatives of as many different companies' versions of different species as possible. Can you guess which I am? Hint, I do not have kinds LOL.

Other animal sets in the Jumbo series include: Farm Animals, Ocean Animals, Pets, Jungle Animals, Zoo Animals, and Dinosaurs.

One to the pics!

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bmathison1972
February 18, 2017, 05:39:56 PM by bmathison1972
Views: 179 | Comments: 0

Review of a complete (well, believed to be complete) set of Ticks by a [currently] unknown manufacturer. Both stemturtle and I have inquiries to the dealer (AliExpress) on who made them, and will update if and when we find out [personally, I suspect Wing Mau but the set currently is not in their online catalogue]. Interestingly, I had received the female A. americanum from Beatrice and then Chad alerted me to the whole set on AliExpress, from which immediately purchased!

There are six figures in the set, a male and engorged female for each of three North American species. They are all solid PVC/plastic and are of remarkable detail! The females are roughly 50 mm long and the males 25-30 mm, minus appendages.

EDIT 2/20/2017: 1) the manufacturer remains a mystery and 2) the set is not complete as there is apparently also a Rhipicephalus sanguineus pair.

Here is an overview of the set:

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Here is a shot of the front of the females:

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A. The lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum.
Native to much of the eastern and south-central United States, this species is responsible for the transmission of agents of tularemia, human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, and human monocytic ehrlichiosis. These figures show the hallmark morphologic features, especially the characteristic single white macula on the dorsal shield of the adult female that give the tick its common name of ‘lone star’.

Dorsal:

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Ventral:

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B. American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis.
This species occurs throughout much of the eastern North America, the South, and along the Pacific Coast, and is responsible for the transmission of agents of tularemia and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. It has also been implicated in tick paralysis. Again, super detail although the color of the female’s dorsal shield is a bit stylized.

Dorsal:

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Ventral:

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C. The black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis.
Native to eastern United States and adjacent Canada, this species is responsible for the transmission of the agents of Lyme disease, babesiosis, human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, and Powassan virus – lineage 2. Another detailed figure, even down to the lack of festoons and the presence of an inverted, u-shaped anal groove!

Dorsal:

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Ventral:

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bmathison1972
February 18, 2017, 05:32:12 PM by bmathison1972
Views: 177 | Comments: 0

Review of the complete set Aquatic Museum by Wing Mau. While in recent years, it appears Wing Mau is producing and marketing figures by Play Visions, Club Earth, and K&M International, this appears to be an original set of theirs. The set consists of six species of crabs, two of which are unique figures (see below).

There are six figures, each a solid piece of PVC/plastic. Each figure comes with a plastic base (there is no attachment method for the base) that when assembled with each other, forms a large base that can be used as a diorama-style play set. I do not remember if each crab figure had a specific base associated with it, so the bases I have for individual species below is random. The figures are typical gashapon-sized, roughtly 25 mm across the carapace (I do not have one handy at the moment for measurements).

This is a recommended set, especially for those interested in aquatic/marine species. It shows up on eBay periodically and is still on the Wing Mau website so it should still be in production.

Here is a group shot of the crabs:

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Here is the assembled base:

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Individual crab figures (in no particular order):

1. Chasmagnathus convexus, the mud-flat crab.
This is to my knowledge a unique figure.

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2. Chiromantes haematocheir, the red-claw crab.
Previously also made by Furuta, Kaiyodo, and Yujin.

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3. Mictyris longicarpus, long-armed soldier crab.
Interestingly, the paper for this figure is mislabeled as Uca arcuata which is also part of the set (see below). Previously made by Cadbury (Yowies) and Epoch.

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4. Uca arcuata.
A fiddler crab previously made by Koro Koro (Toba Aquarium).

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5. Uca crassipes.
A fiddler crab, technically unique by major/professional manufacturers but Jetoar made one for Paleo-Creatures (Unknown Depths).

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6. Uca lacteael.
A fiddler crab previously made by Epoch.

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bmathison1972
February 14, 2017, 04:02:14 PM by bmathison1972
Views: 241 | Comments: 1

Review of the complete set of Insect Collection, by K&M International, Wild Republic Polybags. I have actually been meaning to do a review of this set for a while but it took me a while to finally get the butterfly (the others were all bought individually in a toy store in Tucson, AZ back in 2000...).

There are 10 figures, all solid-piece PVC. They are large, comparable to Safari LTD Incredible Creatures or Hidden Kingdom Insects figures. Some are specific, some are generic, and some are 'Frankenstein' (sculpted like one species, painted like another).

For what it's worth, you can buy sets of 4 unpainted figures (stink bug, butterfly, rhino beetle, and I forget the fourth) if you wanted to paint yours to look like a specific species.

K&M has a good history of making interesting taxa and a variety of species--too bad that does not seem to be the case anymore.

One to the critters, in no particular order. Names and identifications are mine, or credited to Andre (brontodocus) via private conversations:

1. Ground beetle, Carabidae: Carabini: Carabus (or related).
This is one of the 'Frankenstein' figures; the morphology of the sculpt clearly looks like a carabine beetle, but the color look like an emerald weevil in the genus Eupholus. In fact, I considered mine an emerald weevil for years before Andre pointed me in the right direction!

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2. Mantis, gen. sp. (presumably a praying mantis, Mantis religiosa).
This is one of the nice figures in the set, although it is essentially another bin-style green mantid. Under 'Bug of the Day' I currently have it with the praying mantis.

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3. Grasshopper, gen. sp.
To me, this is another generic green grasshopper (GGG), although Andre suggested Tropidacris collaris. Personally I do not think there were any species-level attempts when this was made.

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4. Stink bug: Hemiptera: Pentatomidae, gen. sp.
This is my favorite in the set! Not only because terrestrial hemipterans other than cicadas are RARELY made but also because it's a darn cool figure. I am not a specialist on this group enough to know if this was painted to look like something specific.

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5. Japanese rhinoceros beetle, Allomyrina dichotoma.
This is an easy one, easily recognizable (and not just because it is one of 37 representative of this species I have in my collection!).

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6. Monarch, Danaus plexippus.
Based on the color, there is no real other choice for this, although Andre has pointed out the wing shape is not consistent with the danaines. I have seen this figure marketed online as a viceroy, but that species should have a black band across the hind wings that this figure clearly does not have.

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7. Blow fly, Diptera: Calliphoridae, gen. sp.
I like this one a lot too. Looks to be modeled after a Lucilia species. The wing venation, while not 100% accurate, is at least along the lines of what a calliphorid's would look like!

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8. Carpenter ant, Camponotus species.
Fairly generic at the genus level, but appears to be a carpenter ant. Other species in the genus include C. japonicus by Epoch and C. texanus by Club Earth.

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9. Beetle, gen. sp.
This is the oddest of the group. For years I bounced this around families from Melyridae to Lampyridae! It was not until Andre repainted his (http://animaltoyforum.com/index.php?topic=1301.msg10591#msg10591) that it became clear to me that morphologically it looks like a carrion beetle (Silphidae), although the paint job is nothing like a silphid (at least none I am familiar with). I have this among Silphidae in Bug of the Day.

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10. Stag beetle, Prosopocoilus astacoides.
While this is generic, I think there is enough morphological evidence to place it in the genus Prosopocoilus. For a long time, I considered it  P. inclinatus, but I like Andre's suggestion of astacoides better, especially with regards to head armature. I have edited Bug of the Day to accommadate this change (and hey, it gives me a new species for my collection!)

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brontodocus
February 10, 2017, 09:10:56 AM by brontodocus
Views: 431 | Comments: 1

This is a photographic reference of the Safari Ltd Incredible Creatures (Common) Squirrel Monkey, Saimiri sciureus (Linnaeus, 1758); item No. 2698-29, new for 2017. Snout-vent length is approx. 107 and tail length approx. 145 mm so the scale is approx. 1:2.5 - 1:3 - not 1:2 as stamped on the figure. But still, typically for the Incredible Creatures series, this is a considerably larger than normal figure. The sculpt shows a very nice and sharp texturing with a convincing paint job to match. The Common Squirrel Monkey is still widely distributed in the northern Amazon and IUCN considers its conservation status "Least Concern".












brontodocus
February 09, 2017, 10:10:51 PM by brontodocus
Views: 154 | Comments: 0

Walk-around of the Safari Ltd Wildlife Wonders Whitetail Deer Buck, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann, 1780); item No. 113599, new for 2017. Snout-vent length is approx. 175 mm and shoulder height approx. 100 mm so the scale is between approx. 1:10 and 1:12 (although there are also smaller subspecies for which the scale would be different). The Whitetail deer is a highly adaptable species and overabundant in the U.S.A. and Canada (but declining in some other countries within its geographical range) and can even be a pest, similar to the European Roe Deer, Capreolus capreolus. As a consequence, IUCN lists the Whitetail Deer as "Least Concern".

















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